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How to Avoid Travel Scams

424 Views  ⚫  Asked 3 Years Ago
asked on May 7, 2015 at 23:02
by   vietnammanpower
Typically, scam operators won't give you full and complete information in writing until after you've given them a credit card number, certified check or money order. Once you do get further information, there will be restrictions and conditions which may make it more expensive, or even impossible, to take your trip.

To help avoid being a victim of a travel scam, ASTA (American Society of Travel Agents) provides the following suggestions when evaluating travel offers:

- Retain a healthy dose of skepticism. Be extremely skeptical about unsolicited e-mail, postcard and phone solicitations saying you've been selected to receive a fabulous vacation or anything free. Be especially wary of firms requiring you to wait at least 60 days to take your trip.

- Keep private information private. Never give out your credit card number unless you initiate the transaction and you are confident about the company with which you are doing business.

- Get the facts. You should receive complete details in writing about any trip prior to payment. These details should include the total price; cancelation and change penalties if any; and specific information about all components of the package.

- Follow up. Once you have the complete details of your trip, contact the hotel and transportation companies on your own to make certain the reservations have been made.

- Know where you stand. If you insist on replying to an e-mail or calling a 900-number in response to a travel solicitation, understand the charges and know the risks.

- Know when to fold 'em. Know when to walk away. High-pressure sales presentations that don't allow you time to evaluate the offer, or which require that you disclose your income are red flags to be heeded.

- Protect yourself. Always pay with a credit card if possible. Even legitimate companies can go out of business. Under the Fair Credit Billing Act, credit card customers have the right to refuse paying for charges for services not rendered. Details of the Fair Credit Billing Act can be found at the Federal Trade Commission's Web site.
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