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Disadvantages of giving up Malaysian citizenship

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asked on Mar 1, 2013 at 12:30
by   Notorious
edited on Oct 18, 2016 at 06:32
 
I've been a migrant in Australia for an extended period of time and am seriously considering giving up my Malaysian citizenship. But I have a few questions about it.

1. How will this affect any inheritance or property that I have in my name back in Malaysia. I've heard of scare stories that not having a citizenship there means the government will forfeit any inheritance I may be entitled to or being taxed something ridiculous like 50% on property sold/transferred out of the country.

2. Will it cause me any problems if I need to send money home to support my parents?

I appreciate all answers. My heart is dead set on giving up my citizenship. But depending on how much trouble it is going to cost me I will delay it till I can liquidise all my assets and move it to my home country before giving it up.
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answered on Mar 1, 2013 at 21:08
by   Question Mark
edited Oct 18, 2016 at 06:20
 
Why do you need to give your Malaysian citizenship? Does Australia not give its permanent residents the same rights as its citizens?
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answered on Mar 2, 2013 at 09:28
by   Notorious
edited Oct 18, 2016 at 06:21
 
This isn't so much a matter of rights as it is the fact that I don't care about Malaysia. I want to say "I am an Australian" without it being a lie. And I didn't come here to be asked about my reasons or talked out of doing this. All the answers will do is delay the inevitable. I will renounce my citizenship. Either next month, or 10 years from now.
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answered on Mar 2, 2013 at 12:34
by   Expat
edited Oct 18, 2016 at 06:22
 
In Malaysia you are taxed as a resident or non resident and not according to your citizenship.  If you are not resident in Malaysian for 182 days then you are considered as a non resident. Taxed earned income is at a flat rate of 28%.  For residents there is a sliding scale going up to RM250,000.  The same values apply for inheritance. 

There is no restriction for support remittances to family in Malaysia, but I believe it has to be declared.  These checks can be done on the Internet.
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answered on Mar 3, 2013 at 09:52
by   Ang ger ly
edited Oct 18, 2016 at 06:25
 
As you are not domicile in Malaysia you do not have a Malaysian tax burden.  Malaysia does not have any inheritance tax.  If you are the sole beneficiary, and there is a will you have no issues. The burden of proof lies with you. The above link is of some guidance.

Since you have no allegiance to Malaysia, there is nothing to stop you starting an application process and severing your current citizenship IMMEDIATELY.  Be cautions... host countries do an in-depth investigation before granting citizenship to foreigners.

Also, be aware of your inept responses, and the nom de plume you use. Until you acquire your foreign citizenship, you are subject to Malaysian rules and laws even though you are a migrant of have PR in another land. Nobody was talking you out of it!

http://www.iproperty.com.my/news/3600/death-and-taxes
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answered on Mar 6, 2013 at 13:17
by   Down Under
NONE.
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answered on May 5, 2014 at 00:33
by   Malaysia Boleh
None whatsoever. In fact, if you are a foreigner in Malaysia, you are much more protected than a non-bumi in Malaysia. So, join the club and renounce your citizenship. It is worthless.
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answered on May 7, 2014 at 10:11
by   A Native
edited Oct 18, 2016 at 06:27
 
@Malaysia Boleh... You are disingenuous in your reply:- "if you are a foreigner in Malaysia, you are much more protected than a non-bumi" in Malaysia. Rubbish sir! They have the protection of their respective governments just like you who are now a foreigner in Malaysia. Your statement is prejudiced and incorrect.....a trait you have acquired from your new foreign citizenship masters???

Fundamentally, I believe you are annoyed and begrudge the positive discrimination given to the base inhabitants of Malaysia. Tough,.. live with it or go away. You may argue who are the base inhabitants. I venture to say that they were the inhabitants of Malaya, Sabah  and Sarawak who were here before the colonialists brought the mainly Chinese and Indians to work for them.  Before this influx, the “Natives” lived in harmony with themselves and the land.  The very early migrants integrated with the locals and are known  “Baba” and “Nonya  Peranakans. There was no animosity between the groups.

The later immigrants brought in by the colonialists had to work hard to survive. They knew no other way. Who can blame the locals with a cultural and satisfactory life, for resisting change. The new races termed them as “Lazy.” To this day the English language has a term called “Malaise”.  I will not sink into the depths of being derogatory with a few choice words I have.

Of course the immigrant mentality sized on opportunities to better themselves. They came to seek a better life. Who could blame them for this? Our fathers who fought for “Merdaka” realised this and installed processes to bring the natives up to par. But the new migrants who, even to this day run the economy, refuse to integrate. My in-laws, never mixed with locals, until their daughter married one forty years ago....ME. You only have to open your eyes to see the reality.

Maybe you are too young to remember the race riots of 1969. I recall many shop owners employing token “Bumies”, not giving them anything to do and then calling them “Lazy”.  Today most bumies are employed in the government service. Ask them about their salaries and then come down to earth in terms of equality etc. I believe that when there is true and real equal opportunities for all in a non discriminatory environment, will there be real satisfaction.  This can only happen when despotism in the economic ambit ceases.

In a Capitalist world, opportunities for exploitation come to the very fore.  The normal “Man in the street” is exploited by the rich for the rich to continue to become rich. In that world you come under the category of being exploited.  Enjoy your new club.
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answered on May 12, 2014 at 00:11
by   sweet
I think you can clear your problem and then give up citizenship .
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answered on Dec 30, 2014 at 01:26
by   Mum2child
edited Oct 18, 2016 at 06:27
 
@Notorius

I'm also trying to do the same for my son. He's born in Malaysia and since I'm Malaysian, he got citizenship automatically. But my husband is an Australian, hence our son got Australian citizenship and passport. Now the immigration department is asking me why so when the answer is clearly because it was an automatic given citizenship and not by choice. Do you know how to go about this? Thank you.
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answered on Jan 1, 2015 at 01:21
by   Question Mark
edited Oct 18, 2016 at 06:28
 
@Mum2child

It seems you want your son to maintain and not loose his Malaysian Citizenship.

The law is very clear. Malaysia does not allow dual nationality.  It however recognises Permanent Residence (PR) in another country. Malaysia's nationality laws are very contradictory in this sense.  It recognises PR with all the facilities that the host country affords to its “Normal Citizens” but revokes her citizenship once the incumbent obtains a situation(eg A Passport)which recognises the holder as having full citizenship rights of the host country.  Having an Australian Passport has caused him to loose this given right of being a Malaysian subject.

Your son's birth certificate, apart from automatic Australian Citizenship via his dad, also gives him Australian PR. This I believe would have sufficed, until he was old enough to make up his own mind. 

Your position is a difficult one.  Immigration Officers are only applying the law of the land.  Perhaps seeking the help of a Malaysian Immigration Advocate would help you.
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