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In Public Media how do you distinguish between verifiable facts and propaganda?

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asked on Sep 15, 2021 at 22:49
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edited on Sep 15, 2021 at 22:55
by   jeff005
Political / religious / commercial brainwashing is called publicity.

Publicity is misleading brainwashing by using the fallacy of human logic. It is an important weapon for Autocracy or fooling the people.

Communication refers to the way in which information is spread through a certain medium.

Compared with "communication", "publicity" tends to make use of human logical errors or incomplete information, and encourage information recipients to make wrong judgments and take wrong actions in a way prone to fraud.

In political propaganda, fooling the people is obviously beneficial to the dictator.

In advertising, inducing consumers to consume unnecessarily can make manufacturers obtain more profits.
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answered on Sep 15, 2021 at 22:53
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edited Sep 15, 2021 at 22:54
by   jeff005
There is a massive political propaganda war going on. It relies on the gullibility of the people. It relies on people’s faith and trust in their media and in their governments. It relies on people’s inability or unwillingness to dig deep for the truth.

Ultimately, you have to do the hard work of digging for the truth. Nobody else will do it for you.
First, question everything you read. Do not take anything on face value.

Do a deep dive on the stories and reports. Follow the links. See what was actually said, not what the reporter claims was said.

Check the supporting evidence, if it exists. More often than not, there won’t be any real evidence.
There will likely be fabricated evidence. Things like doctored images, false witness testimonies, words and images taken out of context, etc. Dig deeper here to recognize the fabrication.

It is unlikely you will be able to vet the false testimonies. You can’t dig into the background of the witnesses.
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